Family Notes 11/10/2016

THE ELEVENTH DAY OF OCTOBER IN THE YEAR OF GRACE TWO THOUSAND AND SIXTEEN.


POLITICAL CHRISTIANITY: AMERICAN STYLE

In today’s super-charged political world, the difference between the two major presidential candidates is often defined in terms of which is the greater scoundrel (if not felon) and respected Christian spokespersons are found endorsing them both — in voices equally judgmental and equally dogmatic.

In such times as these, Scot McKnight, in my opinion, is one of the most biblical, balanced, and evenhanded observers and commentators to be found. His blog post, named above in his blog THE JESUS CREED is a case in point.

I urge you to read it at: www.patheos.com/blogs/


DIS-RESPECT

Dr. Wyatt Fenno

“Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen” (Ephesians 4:29).

Unfortunately, it seems that one of the increasingly accepted norms of our everyday experience is this: Disagreement justifies disrespect. And, it doesn’t just happen in the political arena; sadly it happens all around us (work, school, church, etc.)

This is the way the game is played: If I disagree with you, then I don’’t have to like you. In fact, I feel justified to discredit you, to speak disparagingly about you, and to criticize you– and maybe even your family –in unwholesome ways. If I disagree with you, then I even feel entitled to make misleading comments about you to others. These comments could be in the way of exaggerated accusations, things that may be just partially true, or perhaps deceitful and even blatantly dishonest statements about you, made in order to bolster my own personal position or political advantage over you.

Hopefully, you will agree with me: “”Disagreement justifies disrespect”” is not an accepted norm for Christ-followers. Instead of playing the word game of dis-respect, let’’s speak words of life that build up, benefit, and encourage others. May the words of our mouths and meditations of our hearts reflect a wholesome respect for all people — –even for those with whom we find reason to disagree.